Texas

The Texas debacle is a pretty monumental story. A state of 30 million people has been brought to its knees by some cold weather - solely as the result of years of Republican mismanagement.

If this doesn't turn Texas blue, nothing will. And there has been a recent movement of tech companies moving to Texas from California - this should put that to rest too.


In a tweet, Donald Trump, Jr. said that Abbott is a Democrat.  


cramer said:

In a tweet, Donald Trump, Jr. said that Abbott is a Democrat.  

 And now every non-Texan Trumpist will believe that. Hell, maybe some of the dumber Texan Trumpists too.


drummerboy said:

cramer said:

In a tweet, Donald Trump, Jr. said that Abbott is a Democrat.  

 And now every non-Texan Trumpist will believe that. Hell, maybe some of the dumber Texan Trumpists too.

He deleted the tweet. I had to read it at least three times to make sure it said that Abbott is a Democrat. 

"People are confused by Donald Trump Jr.'s reference to Texas' 'Democratic governor,' since the current governor, Greg Abbott, is a Republican"

https://twitter.com/search?q=%22Don%20Jr.%22&src=trend_click&vertical=trends

eta -However,  If you read the tweet, he didn't say Abbott is a Democrat. His attempt to provide cover for Cruz is bad enough 

https://twitter.com/notcapnamerica/status/1362617196917256195/photo/1


I'm pretty sure Costello was a Dem


STANV said:

I'm pretty sure Costello was a Dem

And he would have done a better job about winterizing Texas' energy infrastructure.  


STANV said:

I'm pretty sure Costello was a Dem

 Who's going on first?

  Can Cruz?

Cruz whom?

 It's pronounced Cancun. And you're right, I'd forgotten.

Forgotten whom?

 Cruz whom.

I thought you said it was Cancun.

 Can whom?


To be fair, I lived in Texas for almost 10 years and never once lost power, even during a week long ice storm.  I lived in NJ for about 10 years as well and we lost our power every time the neighbor's dog farted.  

Things may have changed a lot in Texas in the last 10 years but y'all know the story about glass houses.


Klinker said:

To be fair, I lived in Texas for almost 10 years and never once lost power, even during a week long ice storm.  I lived in NJ for about 10 years as well and we lost our power every time the neighbor's dog farted.  

Things may have changed a lot in Texas in the last 10 years but y'all know the story about glass houses.

 I think there's been a bit of a rush to jam what's going on in Texas into a tidy political battle, but to your point, I'm not sure it's that straightforward. I certainly don't think Texas' overall political lean helped, but plenty of states that proudly proclaim their more progressive policies also often fall short in investing and managing critical infrastructure (to my earlier post re public trust, responding to ml1's post on the difficulty of getting people to agree to pay for what's needed).

I'm a bit unclear, for instance, on whether there actually exist federal regulations that would have required Texas to have better winterized their grid. I was a bit more willing to cut Texas some slack on their lack of preparedness given the rarity of such weather there, until I learned they had a similar incident in 2011. That should have been the trigger to make necessary changes, though again I'm not sure if that's really a story about federal regulations.

I do wonder about their isolation from the national grid. Much of the rest of the country was also hit by this storm and other states had rolling black outs, but a rolling black out is very different from several days without power (something I think you actually obscure a bit in noting power outages in NJ compared to the current situation in TX). Although there wasn't a lot of capacity to share on the national grid, would there have been enough to send to TX to have allowed for rolling blackouts rather than the collapse that seems to have happened?


PVW said:

Klinker said:

To be fair, I lived in Texas for almost 10 years and never once lost power, even during a week long ice storm.  I lived in NJ for about 10 years as well and we lost our power every time the neighbor's dog farted.  

Things may have changed a lot in Texas in the last 10 years but y'all know the story about glass houses.

 I think there's been a bit of a rush to jam what's going on in Texas into a tidy political battle, but to your point, I'm not sure it's that straightforward. I certainly don't think Texas' overall political lean helped, but plenty of states that proudly proclaim their more progressive policies also often fall short in investing and managing critical infrastructure (to my earlier post re public trust, responding to ml1's post on the difficulty of getting people to agree to pay for what's needed).

I'm a bit unclear, for instance, on whether there actually exist federal regulations that would have required Texas to have better winterized their grid. I was a bit more willing to cut Texas some slack on their lack of preparedness given the rarity of such weather there, until I learned they had a similar incident in 2011. That should have been the trigger to make necessary changes, though again I'm not sure if that's really a story about federal regulations.

I do wonder about their isolation from the national grid. Much of the rest of the country was also hit by this storm and other states had rolling black outs, but a rolling black out is very different from several days without power (something I think you actually obscure a bit in noting power outages in NJ compared to the current situation in TX). Although there wasn't a lot of capacity to share on the national grid, would there have been enough to send to TX to have allowed for rolling blackouts rather than the collapse that seems to have happened?

Well, it may be that federal regulation might not have forced a solution here, but Texas's approach was clearly profit driven, with little or no catering to the public interest. That can clearly be laid at the feet of Republican privateers in Texas, and should be used by Dems (when the time comes, not now) to bash Republicans to hell. The R's are already out front on protecting themselves from blame with their ridiculous "green energy" argument. The Dems need to go on offense.


Federal regulation may not have prevented the Texas disaster, but the things Texas did to avoid regulation definitely are the cause.

They operate their system entirely "in-state", no connections to any other state, so there is no "interstate market" for power in Texas.  So, when their generating units stopped working in the cold (also due to unwise choices), they had no way to get power from any place else - because they deliberately designed it that way.


nohero said:

Federal regulation may not have prevented the Texas disaster, but the things Texas did to avoid regulation definitely are the cause.

They operate their system entirely "in-state", no connections to any other state, so there is no "interstate market" for power in Texas.  So, when their generating units stopped working in the cold (also due to unwise choices), they had no way to get power from any place else - because they deliberately designed it that way.

 this is the whole point.  El Paso was able to keep the power on because unlike most of the rest of Texas, they are connected to the electrical grid outside of Texas.


Texas is run by a bunch of segregationists. Their America can be great again like it used to be. Separate water fountains and  all..

I love the fact that AOC and Beto have been very proactive in helping out the citizens of Texas. That is the way to defeat these republicans at the ballot box.


Texas back in the news. Gov. Abbot is opening up the state completely. Even canceling the mask mandate.

Will have to keep an eye on how new cases do in the coming weeks.


Since going it alone and lifting state regulations worked so well with electricity, Texas is going to try it with the pandemic.


Just wanted to note what the stats are at this time so we can see of any affect 2-4 weeks out:

March deaths: 44,597 

New deaths yesterday was 289

March 4 cases 7,357 - The range in the past month has had a daily low of 2,882 (2/15) and a high of 14,524 (2/5)

They were trending down overall.  

When you look at the trend - it shows that the difference between universal masks and "worse" is virtually identical through April:

https://covid19.healthdata.org/united-states-of-america/texas?view=total-deaths&tab=trend

After April the trend between protection and no protection doesn't spike a whole lot - perhaps this is the gamble they're taking in hope of the vaccine kicking in.


We may get a real-world test of Covid transmission when having the elderly immunized, and most others are not yet immunized, as families gather for the upcoming Easter/Passover holidays.




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