Asian Hibiscus?

We have these, commonly known as "Rose of Sharon", growing in our ornamental garden in the back yard.  We didn't plant them, they just showed up a few years ago.  I like them but they are hard to keep under control.  Looking for advice.


They are prolific spreaders.  Right after they bloom, or before they go to seed, you have to remove the seed pods.  Otherwise you end up with little Rose of Sharons everywhere. 


Rob_Sandow said:

We have these, commonly known as "Rose of Sharon", growing in our ornamental garden in the back yard.  We didn't plant them, they just showed up a few years ago.  I like them but they are hard to keep under control.  Looking for advice.

 I'll bet if you post a few for adoption you will have volunteers digging a few out. Mine are not spreading that much but my Butterfly Bush is sending out relatives to populate my garden and I highly recommend  them. Butterflies everywhere.


I had problems with my Butterfly Bush.  It had a shallow & 'thirsty' roots, so it killed the grass about 6' out.  If you plant one, plan on watering more.


tomcat said:

I had problems with my Butterfly Bush.  It had a shallow & 'thirsty' roots, so it killed the grass about 6' out.  If you plant one, plan on watering more.

 Hmm, never noticed that. Of course crab grass has taken over the front lawn so they will have to vie for attention.


“ hard to control”:

If too tall, cut down as low as you would like. Do it early if you want blooms same year. It blooms on new wood. If too wide, use pick axe or sharp spade to divide crown after cutting down very low in spring. Or even later winter. Or even sooner.

For volunteers: pull up by hand. If over a year old, may need shovel. Dead heading should obviate need for this.

My RoS did not self seed till it was in ground for over 20 years.


dickf3 said:

BB was mentioned.

https://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/blog/invasive-species-spotlight-truth-about-butterfly-bush

https://extension.psu.edu/avoiding-invasives-butterfly-bush

 Thanks for sharing these articles. I was considering adding a few more but you have changed my mind. On the flip side, some of the recommended substitutes like Liatris and Echinacea  have drawbacks. They appeal to the woodchucks and deer that live in my garden. I plant mostly for birds and particularly Hummingbirds and Goldfinch loved my Echinacea but once their woodsy friends sampled them, they were nibbled down to the ground.

I've been experimenting for 25 years and the deer even eat the Rose of Sharon, Butterfly Bush seems to be one of the shrubs that they ignore. They even eat both my herbaceous Peonies and my Itoh Peonies at this time of year. So fast this year that I didn't have to worry about powdery mildew.


Morganna said:

dickf3 said:

BB was mentioned.

https://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/blog/invasive-species-spotlight-truth-about-butterfly-bush

https://extension.psu.edu/avoiding-invasives-butterfly-bush

 Thanks for sharing these articles. I was considering adding a few more but you have changed my mind. On the flip side, some of the recommended substitutes like Liatris and Echinacea  have drawbacks. They appeal to the woodchucks and deer that live in my garden. I plant mostly for birds and particularly Hummingbirds and Goldfinch loved my Echinacea but once their woodsy friends sampled them, they were nibbled down to the ground.

I've been experimenting for 25 years and the deer even eat the Rose of Sharon, Butterfly Bush seems to be one of the shrubs that they ignore. They even eat both my herbaceous Peonies and my Itoh Peonies at this time of year. So fast this year that I didn't have to worry about powdery mildew.

 I don’t know what size plant you’re looking for, but I have a yard full of deer and the ONE plant they don’t touch is my lavender.  And when I accidentally brush against it it smells nice too.


spontaneous said:

 I don’t know what size plant you’re looking for, but I have a yard full of deer and the ONE plant they don’t touch is my lavender.  And when I accidentally brush against it it smells nice too.

 Thanks, I haven't tried it but I have a few spots that it would work so I'll buy some.

As for a lovely scent, I planted chocolate mint. It's considered an aggressive spreader but that is what I need for a particular spot. It creeps along the ground and is hanging over a stone wall.

They don't touch my annual red salvia which I plant for the Hummingbirds but they chomp away on my perennial salvia, or purple sage. 

They are rascals.




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